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Tag Archives: #365yoga

Mastering Crow {#365yoga}

(source : lifeinterstitial)

Judith’s wisdom for March 10 was that difficulty is one hundred percent subjective. What is easy for me may be hard for you. What you make look simple eludes me. She then challenged us #365yoga-ers to pick an asana that we find difficult and keep at it for the next twenty-one days.

The first pose that came to mind is crow pose (crane pose / bakasana). I lack both balance and upper arm strength. So for the rest of the month I set to mastering flying. (What asana did you choose?)

I’m starting with these videos by Sadie Nardini. VERY helpful!

 

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#365yoga {01.30 – 02.05}

source : NamWizard

I’ve realized that while this blog is mostly for to me to be able to look back on my journey, neither one of us wants to read bland recaps of something you may be doing yourself. How I’m going to solve this, however, I haven’t completely worked out. So this week I’m going to try to go a little deeper into my favorite and most challenging day of A Year of Living Your Yoga and see where that takes us.

Favorite Lesson : Jan 31 – Yoga is not about avoiding difficulty.

When challenged to do something difficult for me for 5 minutes, I chose to apply for jobs. You might be thinking “that does not sound difficult” or if you’re my husband you might be thinking “it’s about damn time”. I really don’t like to think about why it’s hard for me, but without facing this, I can’t move past it.

When I lost my job 2 years ago (has it really been that long?!), I felt completely rejected. While rationally I can see that the elimination of my territory was more about the company’s lack of market research prior to hiring me, emotionally I feel like I wasn’t good enough. I did, however, jump full force into the application process right away. Hundreds of applications and months later without a lead just made the initial emotional wound that much deeper.

Then I got my current job as a waitress. While I wouldn’t call it “stress-free”, I don’t bring work home. It is easy for me and I’m good at it. Is it what I want to do for the rest of my life? NO! So why am I clinging to it? Because I’m excellent at denial. I’m comfortable here and it’s easy to let time pass without acknowledging the need for change.

Thinking about only having to apply for jobs for 5 minutes made it feel less of a big deal. I actually ended up working on them for longer than I anticipated. I’m hoping to go into this “only 5 minutes” mode for at least one night a week from now on.

Most Difficult Lesson : Feb 03 – Life is holy.

When asked to dedicate my practice to God or a divine being, I was at a complete loss. As I’ve mentioned on my Open Mind page, I’m not a religious person. I neither believe nor disbelieve in a higher power. I honestly don’t care either way. I am a good person (most of the time) and do so merely to be a good person. My parents chose to raise my sister and I to follow many of the same moral rules you see in religions like Christianity, but without the faith or fear of an afterlife or higher being.

So how do I align my beliefs, or lack there of, with this aspect of my yoga? I ended up dedicating that day to my husband instead. I picked someone who loves and supports me. Someone who helps me be a better person. I could have easily picked my parents, sister, or a close friend with the same intention.

I tried to look up some information on yoga for non-theists and came across a lot of articles about fear of yogic religion. Let me be clear, I don’t fear religion and welcome the ideas of many different cultures. To each their own. While I’m aware that I can benefit my life both physically and mentally with yoga without the spiritual aspects, I’m wondering how to best supplement them. If you are an atheist, or agnostic, or even Buddhist, how do you approach the theist side of your practice?

 

#365yoga {01.26 – 01.29}

source : Gosia Janik

I posted a few days ago about starting #365yoga and while I’m journaling each morning about the previous day, I think I’m going to just do weekly summaries on Sundays for the blog. If you are participating in #365yoga and Tweeting/blogging, please let me know so I can follow your journey!

This was a short week due to my starting the program on Wednesday. This was the perfect day for me to start. 01.26 reminds us of the need for consistency of discipline and challenges us to practice for the following 21 days without missing a single one. I’ve already had a few days where I’ve been hesitant to get on my mat. However, I’m always glad I did afterward. I’m also shocked at how asking myself to stop and pay attention to my feelings on a particular day has already started a habit of doing it the following days as well. I love taking a second to close my eyes and feel happy or confident or even angry.

Favorite Lesson: Creating an intention for my practice.

While I really enjoyed and needed the reminder to find intention for my practice on Thursday. I’m concerned about using the same intention every time. Not that this would be terrible, but I feel like I should find a variation in order to expand my practice further. Do you have any suggestions for intentions?

Most Challenging Lesson: Noticing resistance to my life.

I was a little confused about this one. Was I supposed to notice negative thoughts? What does it mean to resist your life?

How did your week of #365yoga go?

*I picked this image for the week due to Luna’s aversion to my doing yoga. She’s been very vocal while I’m trying to meditate.

#365yoga

A Year of Living Your Yoga by P.T. Judith Hanson Lasater Ph.D.

A Year of Living Your Yoga is a collection of aphorisms by Judith Hanson Lasater, drawn from her teaching of yoga over the past three decades. Reflecting her knowledge of classic yoga philosophy, her own yoga practice and teaching, and her life experiences, these aphorisms are inspiring, humorous, and down-to-earth. There is one aphorism for each day of the year, along with a suggested practice. Some practices will take you onto your yoga mat and others will take you off of it. All will give you the opportunity to be present to yourself, and to life’s ups and downs—day by day, breath by breath, moment by moment.

– via Amazon.com

You may or may not have noticed under my Books Page that I’ve started A Year of Living Your Yoga by Judith Hanson Lasater. I started the program on Wednesday, but since I started late I did go through and read the days I missed. I’m extremely excited about this program! Each day contains one aphorism and a challenge on how to apply it to your life for that day.

For example:

Jan 26 – Without discipline there is no art.

Living Your Yoga: The art of yoga comes from the consistency of discipline. Today resolve to practice for the next twenty-one days without missing a single one. Note it on your calendar.

Jan 27 – Discipline arises from clarity of intention and commitment.

Living Your Yoga: Sit quietly on your mat. Create an intention for your practice before you begin, such as this Mantra for Daily Living: Today I will focus my practice on inviting inner stillness.

(my favorite of the ones I missed) Jan 19 – Suffering comes from our unwillingness to be present.

Living Your Yoga: Today notice five recurring thoughts that take you away from your life as it is. Write them down. When you get a chance, burn the paper lovingly, and let those thoughts drift away with the smoke.

I’m keeping a journal of my favorite aphorisms and my thoughts/feelings on the challenges and hope to update once a week. I’m doing this via my Kindle. While I think it would be nice to have the book in hand, I always have my Kindle on me and it keeps my place so I can just open straight up to the next day.

Are you participating in #365yoga?